Famous Trademarks Have Broad Protection (royal treatment) Reply

Famous trademarks are treated like trademark royalty and have broad protection against Screen Shot 2016-02-17 at 5.40.07 PMsimilar trademarks used on both related and unrelated goods and services.

For example, a winery applied for USPTO trademark registration of the term “PINK FLOYD” for wine and was refused registration because:

the applied-for mark consists of or includes matter which may falsely suggest a connection with PINK FLOYD the music group.  Although PINK FLOYD is not connected with the goods and/or services provided by applicant under the applied-for mark, PINK FLOYD is so famous that consumers would presume a connection.

The USPTO’s refusal to register the applied-for PINK FLOYD trademark for wine includes a four-part test used to evaluate the existence of a false connection:

The following is required for a showing of false connection under the Trademark Act Section 2(a)[in the U.S.]:

  1. The mark sought to be registered is the same as, or a close approximation of, the name or identity previously used by another person or institution;
  2. The mark would be recognized as such, in that it points uniquely and unmistakably to that person or institution;
  3. The person or institution identified in the mark is not connected with the goods sold or services performed by applicant under the mark; and
  4. The fame or reputation of the named person or institution is of such a nature that a connection with such person or institution would be presumed when applicant’s mark is used on its goods and/or services.

This is one example of the broad protection granted to famous trademarks.  (Find another way to pay tribute to a favorite band or music group).

BY: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.    crown

For personalized legal services you are welcome to contact me at vk@kasterlegal.com

See also: a copy of the USPTO’s final office action for the PINK FLOYD application above [Serial No.77588367]; an earlier post on new business trademarks at http://wp.me/p10nNq-B; an INTA fact sheet on Famous and Well-Known Marks at www.inta.org; earlier posts on trademarks at https://iplegalfreebies.wordpress.com/category/t-r-a-d-e-m-a-r-k/; a link to U.S. Federal Trademark Law at www.uspto.gov; @iplegalfreebies and www.kasterlegal.com.

 

 

 

New Rules for Creative Revenue Reply

Creative revenue streams – Here are a few of my favorites:FullSizeRender (8)

  • Inexpensive monthly subscription fees for access to video tutorials (for example teaching folks to use photography equipment or to play an instrument)
  • Parlaying social media followers into an eager audience for a book launch.
  • Composing music scores for videos and films. (It’s often much more economical for film and video makers to commission original compositions than to try and get rights to popular songs.  When I saw a preview of the documentary “Doing It In The Park: Pick-Up Basketball New York City” one of the filmmakers shared that he wished he’d commissioned an all original score from the outset).
  • Demonstration YouTube videos that include a retailer affiliate link. (Retailer affiliate links make money when folks click the link and make a purchase).

I believe that smart, creative, entrepreneurial folks can rise to the top, get noticed and make money (if they want to).

BY: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

For personalized legal services you are welcome to contact me at vk@kasterlegal.com

See also: “How to write a © Copyright Notice and Why to Use it” at http://wp.me/p10nNq-18; Posts on trademark topics for new businesses: https://goo.gl/xqJrOA; #creativerevenue, #valueyourart, #valueyou; @iplegalfreebies and www.kasterlegal.com.

Using the Registered Trademark Symbol: ® Reply

trademarks on the streetWalking down the block today in New York City, I noticed a dozen famous trademarks: WHOLE FOODS MARKET (store sign), NYC TAXI (decal on a cab);  LOUIS VUITTON (purse), 7 ELEVEN (store sign), CON EDISON (on a service truck), UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE (on a blue mail box), DUNKIN’ DONUTS (store sign), POLO RALPH LAUREN (logo on a man’s shirt), NIKE (swoosh on a shopping bag); HAAGEN-DAZS (on an ice cream delivery truck); GAP (store sign) and MTA (logo on a poster announcing a subway update).

Once a trademark has been registered with the USPTO, the trademark owner is vested with a bundle of exclusive rights to use the trademark AND the owner also has the right to use the coveted Registered Trademark symbol: ®.  The photo-collage inserted into this post points out several uses of the ® symbol that I noticed out on the street.

Here is a brief excerpt from the United States Patent & Trademark Office’s website on using the ® symbol:

[Y]ou may use the federal registration symbol “®” only after the USPTO actually registers a mark , and not while an application is pending. Also, you may use the registration symbol with the mark only on or in connection with the goods and/or services listed in the federal trademark registration.

Registered trademarks are all over the streets of New York City!

BY: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

For personalized legal services you are welcome to contact me at vk@kasterlegal.com

See also: Other blog posts on using trademark symbols at https://iplegalfreebies.wordpress.com/category/t-r-a-d-e-m-a-r-k/trademarks-tm-sm/; USPTO (U.S. Patent & Trademark Office) resources at www.uspto.gov and www.uspto.gov/faq/trademarks.jsp#_Toc275426682; INTA (International Trademark Association) fact sheet on trademark use at http://inta.org/TrademarkBasics/FactSheets/Pages/TrademarkUseFactSheet.aspx; @iplegalfreebies and www.kasterlegal.com.

Looking back at the top posts on IP Legal Freebies Reply

As we kick off a new year, let’s take a look at the top posts on IP LEGAL FREEBIES:

  1. Copyright Law: Using quotes from someone else in your book, blog or website Using Dr. Martin Luther King Junior’s famous ‘I Have a Dream’ speech as an example of a copyrighted work filled with famous quotes… we take a look at the fair use doctrine and how evaluations are made regarding use of copyrighted content.
  2. Music Royalties will start being paid for plays on YouTubeIn 2012 YouTube started paying royalties for plays on their website.
  3. How to write a © copyright notice and why to use itWriting a copyright notice on your original work is free and easy to do. (if you aren’t already in the habit of doing this, make it a new years resolution!)
  4. Copyright Law: Using quotes from someone else in your book, blog or website (part two)Remember that the HEART of a work is heavily protected by copyright law.
  5. Copyright is valuable – ‘The Birthday Song’ earns $2 Million a year in royaltiesWe all know it… it’s only eight measures long, spans an octave and was written for children …but it’s a big money maker.
  6. Understand How You’re Getting Paid – ROYALTIES on GROSS vs NET REVENUE and an ADVANCESeeing these words in a contract or agreement will impact payment… become familiar with the meaning of these terms.
  7. ‘NAME Brand’ – Using your name as a brand and trademarkPaul Revere may have been the first American entrepreneur to use his name to brand his products. Are you considering it too?

Happy New Year! Thank you for reading. Wishing you all the best with your creative and entrepreneurial endeavors.

For the latest post see: https://iplegalfreebies.wordpress.com and www.kasterlegal.com; @iplegalfreebies and www.kasterlegal.com.

BY: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

For personalized legal services you are welcome to contact me at vk@kasterlegal.com

 

Turkey trademarks – don’t run a-fowl of descriptiveness Reply

We all know and love many popular TURKEY trademarks… like WILD TURKEY and TURKEY HILL… and notice that these TURKEY marks are used on products that have nothing to do with turkeys. For example:

  • WILD TURKEY is trademarked for whiskey, distilled spirits, and liqueur
  • TURKEY HILL is trademarked for ice cream cones and other frozen confections

By comparison, popular trademarks that are used to sell turkeys don’t use the word ‘turkey’ in their mark. For example: BUTTERBALL, HONEYSUCKLE WHITE… and my personal favorite CAJUN GROCER (that sells delicious turducken – http://www.cajungrocer.com).

THE SECRET? Words that describe the goods and services that they sell are descriptive and are weak trademarks. In fact, it can be difficult and sometimes impossible to register a descriptive mark with the USPTO for trademark protection. (There is a sliding scale for measuring descriptiveness. Some terms are more descriptive than others. This example of trademarking the word TURKEY (as a brand for turkey products) is a highly descriptive use of the word that overlaps with it’s dictionary definition). The reason behind blocking trademark registration for descriptive terms is logical. Since trademark registration grants exclusive use to the owner… and dictionary words are free for us all to use…. USPTO trademarks are not registered for descriptive terms because this would block words from being used in commerce (by competitors) to describe common goods and services.

Back to the trademarks listed above, the popular WILD TURKEY trademark has a fairly strong monopoly on using the word TURKEY to sell whisky and other alcohol products. Similarly, TURKEY HILL is a popular trademark with a fairly strong monopoly on using the word TURKEY to sell ice cream.

When creating brands for your business and registering trademarks… remember not to run a-fowl of trademark descriptiveness. Enjoy your Thanksgiving!

See also www.uspto.gov; @iplegalfreebies and www.kasterlegal.com.

BY: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

For personalized legal services you are welcome to contact me at vk@kasterlegal.com

 

Avoid Trademark Rejection for Descriptiveness Reply

Descriptiveness is a slightly unexpected and common pitfall when it comes to registering a trademark.  If your trademark is descriptive, meaning that your mark merely describes your goods and services in a common and generic way, then trademark registration will be difficult  unless modifications are made to enhance the uniqueness of your mark.

For example, if you have a Doughnut shop where you sell hot doughnuts and you submit an application to register the trademark ‘hot doughnuts’ …your application will likely be denied because, your mark merely describes your goods and services in a common way.  [i.e. – a Google search on ‘hot doughnuts’ returns over  1,740,000 results in 0.18 seconds and these results are linked to doughnut shops and bakeries all over the world that also use the phrase ‘hot doughnuts’ to describe what they sell.]  Since ‘hot doughnuts’ is commonly used to describe doughnuts, it is too literal of a description to be registered as a trademark for a shop selling hot doughnuts.

Fire up your creative juices and make your trademark unique and not merely descriptive.

See also: more info on recent disputes involving this issue: Coppola and his family trust have sued a small restaurant in Novato, CA –> http://wp.me/p10nNq-kz and designer Louboutin’s Red Sole Shoes–> http://wp.me/p10nNq-cy ; @iplegalfreebies and www.kasterlegal.com.

BY: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

For personalized legal services you are welcome to contact me at vk@kasterlegal.com

Owning a Trademark = Power (Exclusive Use of a Trademark) 7

A major benefit of registering a Trademark is the exclusive right to use the Trademark, which comes with registration.  Ownership of a registered Trademark bestows an exclusive right to use the Trademark with or on ALL similar goods and services.  This exclusive right restricts other people, companies and businesses from using your Trademarked term or logo on similar goods and services.  This exclusive right can be a powerful tool in the marketplace.

For example, POPSICLE is a registered Trademark of Unilever and only Unilever has the authority to use the word POPSICLE when selling, advertising and promoting frozen treats on a stick.  This means that the word POPSICLE is off limits to any other person or company selling frozen treats on a stick.  POPSICLE cannot be used on other companies’ product names, blogs, napkins, merchandising, or advertising.  As you can see, this carries a lot of weight in the market place against competitors.  The unauthorized use of the mark POPSICLE recently put a small shop in Brooklyn in a bind when they started making and selling a product called ‘People’s Popsicles.’  Since the shop did not have permission from Unilever to use the POPSICLE trademark, the shop had to rename their product, print new merchandising, and erase every use of POPSICLE from their menu and blog.

Exclusive use rights that come with owning a registered Trademark are powerful.  Don’t underestimate their value in the market place.

BY: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

For personalized legal services you are welcome to contact me at vk@kasterlegal.com

More information on this subject: ‘NAME Brand’ – Using your Name as a Brand and TrademarkIs Unilever’s Popsicle Trademark Melting Away? at  http://www.kasterlegal.com/storage/NYSBA%20Electronically%20In%20Touch.%20%20Article%20by%20Vanessa%20Kaster.pdf and http://www.nysba.org/Content/NavigationMenu24/ElectronicallyInTouch/2010Issues/September2010/default.htm; @iplegalfreebies and www.kasterlegal.com